CIO Summit | November 6-8, 2016 | Hotel Palomar Phoenix - Phoenix, AZ, USA

↓ Agenda Key

Keynote Presentation

Visionary speaker presents to entire audience on key issues, challenges and business opportunities

Keynote Presentations give attending delegates the opportunity to hear from leading voices in the industry. These presentations feature relevant topics and issues aligned with the speaker's experience and expertise, selected by the speaker in concert with the summit's Content Committee." title="Keynote Presentations give attending delegates the opportunity to hear from leading voices in the industry. These presentations feature relevant topics and issues aligned with the speaker's experience and expertise, selected by the speaker in concert with the summit's Content Committee.

Executive Visions

Panel moderated by Master of Ceremonies and headed by four executives discussing critical business topics

Executive Visions sessions are panel discussions that enable in-depth exchanges on critical business topics. Led by a moderator, these sessions encourage attending executives to address industry challenges and gain insight through interaction with expert panel members." title="Executive Visions sessions are panel discussions that enable in-depth exchanges on critical business topics. Led by a moderator, these sessions encourage attending executives to address industry challenges and gain insight through interaction with expert panel members.

Thought Leadership

Solution provider-led session giving high-level overview of opportunities

Led by an executive from the vendor community, Thought Leadership sessions provide comprehensive overviews of current business concerns, offering strategies and solutions for success. This is a unique opportunity to access the perspective of a leading member of the vendor community." title="Led by an executive from the vendor community, Thought Leadership sessions provide comprehensive overviews of current business concerns, offering strategies and solutions for success. This is a unique opportunity to access the perspective of a leading member of the vendor community.

Think Tank

End user-led session in boardroom style, focusing on best practices

Think Tanks are interactive sessions that place delegates in lively discussion and debate. Sessions admit only 15-20 participants at a time to ensure an intimate environment in which delegates can engage each other and have their voices heard." title="Think Tanks are interactive sessions that place delegates in lively discussion and debate. Sessions admit only 15-20 participants at a time to ensure an intimate environment in which delegates can engage each other and have their voices heard.

Roundtable

Interactive session led by a moderator, focused on industry issue

Led by an industry analyst, expert or a member of the vendor community, Roundtables are open-forum sessions with strategic guidance. Attending delegates gather to collaborate on common issues and challenges within a format that allows them to get things done." title="Led by an industry analyst, expert or a member of the vendor community, Roundtables are open-forum sessions with strategic guidance. Attending delegates gather to collaborate on common issues and challenges within a format that allows them to get things done.

Case Study

Overview of recent project successes and failures

Case Studies allow attending executives to hear compelling stories about implementations and projects, emphasizing best practices and lessons learned. Presentations are immediately followed by Q&A sessions." title="Case Studies allow attending executives to hear compelling stories about implementations and projects, emphasizing best practices and lessons learned. Presentations are immediately followed by Q&A sessions.

Focus Group

Discussion of business drivers within a particular industry area

Focus Groups allow executives to discuss business drivers within particular industry areas. These sessions allow attendees to isolate specific issues and work through them. Presentations last 15-20 minutes and are followed by Q&A sessions." title="Focus Groups allow executives to discuss business drivers within particular industry areas. These sessions allow attendees to isolate specific issues and work through them. Presentations last 15-20 minutes and are followed by Q&A sessions.

Analyst Q&A Session

Moderator-led coverage of the latest industry research

Q&A sessions cover the latest industry research, allowing attendees to gain insight on topics of interest through questions directed to a leading industry analyst." title="Q&A sessions cover the latest industry research, allowing attendees to gain insight on topics of interest through questions directed to a leading industry analyst.

Vendor Showcase

Several brief, pointed overviews of the newest solutions and services

Taking the form of three 10-minute elevator pitches by attending vendors, these sessions provide a concise and pointed overview of the latest solutions and services aligned with attendee needs and preferences." title="Taking the form of three 10-minute elevator pitches by attending vendors, these sessions provide a concise and pointed overview of the latest solutions and services aligned with attendee needs and preferences.

Executive Exchange

Pre-determined, one-on-one interaction revolving around solutions of interest

Executive Exchanges offer one-on-one interaction between executives and vendors. This is an opportunity for both parties to make key business contacts, ask direct questions and get the answers they need. Session content is prearranged and based on mutual interest." title="Executive Exchanges offer one-on-one interaction between executives and vendors. This is an opportunity for both parties to make key business contacts, ask direct questions and get the answers they need. Session content is prearranged and based on mutual interest.

Open Forum Luncheon

Informal discussions on pre-determined topics

Led by a moderator, Open Forum Luncheons offer attendees informal, yet focused discussions on current industry topics and trends over lunch." title="Led by a moderator, Open Forum Luncheons offer attendees informal, yet focused discussions on current industry topics and trends over lunch.

Networking Session

Unique activities at once relaxing, enjoyable and productive

Networking opportunities take various unique forms, merging enjoyable and relaxing activities with an environment conducive to in-depth conversation. These gatherings allow attendees to wind down between sessions and one-on-one meetings, while still furthering discussions and being productive." title="Networking opportunities take various unique forms, merging enjoyable and relaxing activities with an environment conducive to in-depth conversation. These gatherings allow attendees to wind down between sessions and one-on-one meetings, while still furthering discussions and being productive.

 

Sunday, November 6, 2016 - CIO Summit

3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Registration & Greeting

4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Exclusive CXO Keynote

Top 10 Competencies of the Modern IT Executive

Communication,” “business acumen,” and “relationship building” are all familiar entries on every “Top IT Leadership Skills” list ever written. While these attributes continue to be important in our current climate of risk, innovation and IT opportunity, they are just a drop in the bucket. In an era where technology belongs to everyone, the technology executive must have so much more. In this newly updated presentation, Martha Heller, an IT executive recruiter and author of The CIO Paradox and Be the Business: CIOs in the New Era of IT (fall 2016) presents a list of new skills critical to any IT leader working today. Drawing on personal interviews with more than 400 successful CIOs, Heller, a master storyteller, offers case studies, anecdotes, advice and impressions to arm attendees with the skills they need to bring their companies into the future.

Presented by:

Martha Heller, President , Heller Search Associates View details

 
 

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm

Networking Cocktail Reception

7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

Networking Dinner

8:30 pm - 10:00 pm

After Dinner Networking

Monday, November 7, 2016 - CIO Summit

7:00 am - 7:55 am

Registration and Networking Breakfast

8:00 am - 8:10 am

Welcome Address and Opening Remarks

8:10 am - 8:50 am

Keynote Presentation

Moving from Operations to Transformations

The accepted number for the amount of the IT budget that is tied up in operational spend, in paying to maintain technology that has already been purchased, is 80% leaving only 20% for the IT department to use to drive new projects. Because this level of funding is so low, as much as 70% of IT sponsored projects fail. Yet IT departments are being constantly pushed to be innovative, to find a way to embrace new technologies and leverage them to drive business change. How can you do that when your time, money, and effort goes to just keeping the lights on? Join us as we collectively explore this issue and examine some of the successful strategies that are being leveraged by top IT leaders.

Takeaways:

  • The pressure on CIO’s to drive change has never been higher, but fortunately neither has the opportunity to do so
  • Disruptive technologies don’t just have the power to disrupt IT for the worse, they have the power to disrupt the business for the better
  • Fortune favors the bold; now is the time to take a leap into new modes of business to break the operational spend stranglehold

8:55 am - 9:35 am

Keynote Presentation

Becoming A Service-Oriented Enterprise

Many organizations are discovering that adopting service catalogues, curated collections of business and IT services, can both enhance IT-business relationships (by clearly outlining capabilities and expectations as well service costs) and improve operational competency (by standardizing service offerings). Service catalogues are only as useful as their accuracy however and a service catalogue with service levels that cannot be met can in many have a greater negative impact than not having a service catalogue at all. To ensure that service levels are set appropriately it is important to understand the capabilities of the people, processes, and tools that underlie them and this requires measurement up front to eliminate guess work.

Takeaways:

  • Service catalogues have a demonstrated value within enterprises to manage costs, improve service delivery, and enhance relationships
  • As important as service definition is to success, service level definition may be even more so to avoid “over-commit, under-deliver” situations
  • Without good performance metrics, the kind derived from an IT Service Optimization platform, establishing appropriate service levels is nothing more than a shot in the dark with a low probability of success

9:45 am - 10:15 am

Executive Exchange

Think Tank

Embracing the Mobile Wallet

There has been much discussion over the last couple of years about the development and adoption of Mobile or Digital Wallets, yet the pace of development and adoption continues to be slow. As Near Field Communications (NFC) becomes more ubiquitous across mobile devices, the discussion of e-Wallet development and adoption will only increase. Will the future be client-side wallets or provider-side wallets, will it be individual wallets offered by individual retailers, or amalgamated wallets offered by consortia?

Takeaways:

  • Adoption rates are currently low with initial indications they may stay that way, with less than 40% indicating they would use an e-wallet
  • Mobile retailing is expected to eclipse $500M in just a few years however, growth that needs greater mobile wallet adoption
  • Retailers need to take a position on mobile wallets now to put themselves in a position to benefit from the growth potential

Think Tank

Making ITIL Work – Moving Beyond Frameworks and Getting to Action

In order to deal with the increasing pressure to increase service delivery, service efficiency, and service effectiveness, IT departments are adopting the ITIL framework. While ITIL adoption has lots of press around the benefits that it can deliver, it doesn’t do so without hard work, and it doesn’t do so without the tools that activate, measure, and validate adopted frameworks and processes. In order to achieve the four goals of ITIL adoption – reduced cost of operations, improved service delivery, improved user satisfaction, improved compliance – IT leaders need to be prepared to move beyond just the process and invest in the technology solutions that make them work.

Takeaways:

  • IT departments are under increasing pressure to improve effectiveness and help overcome core business challenges
  • Standardized process frameworks, such as those provided by ITIL, are a tried and true way to become more effective
  • Frameworks by themselves are about as useful as the paper they are written on and tools are required to make them work

10:20 am - 10:50 am

Executive Exchange

Thought Leadership

Securing the Mobile, Cloud-First Enterprise

More and more organizations are embracing the cloud and mobility to improve productivity and make their business more competitive. This is turning the current security landscape upside down. At the same time newer, more advanced threats are creating new risks that traditional security appliances struggle to keep up with. CIOs and CISOs are looking for new approaches to securely adopt cloud and mobility.

In this session Zscaler will discuss why many IT organizations are choosing to adopt a cloud-based approach to securely enable mobility, cloud applications and social media, while ensuring compliance and reducing risk. The audience will learn how a cloud security strategy can help them. Protect users from advanced threats:

  • Why traditional security appliances are failing
  • Why full SSL content inspection is necessary to detect emerging, advanced security threats
  • How to embrace cloud with full visibility and control of Shadow IT Get real-time visibility and control: mine billions of user transactions in seconds to quickly identify gaps in security and ensure compliance with corporate policies.

Sponsored by:

Zscaler View details

 
 

10:55 am - 11:25 am

Executive Exchange

Roundtable


Sponsored by:

TEAM International Services, Inc View details

 
 

Roundtable

Multi-Platform Mobile Development

As enterprises take that deep dive into mobile computing, they move from simply allowing mobile devices into their environment towards leveraging those devices to fulfill roles and functions otherwise unaddressable by traditional devices. This means developing and deploying apps, but things aren’t as simple as “write once, publish many”. Leaving the issue of platform variability to the side, one of the biggest issues in app development is form factor differentiation and the clearest expression of that issue is the difference between smartphones and tablets. While Android co-founder Andy Rubin is on record as saying form factor should have no bearing, there is a strong body of evidence that says apps should be developed differently for different devices if the goal is the utmost usability and productivity. As IT leaders invest more heavily in mobile application development, this is an issue that requires significant deliberation to ensure development time and money is not squandered.

Takeaways:

  • Tablets are not simply Smartphones made bigger; they are unique devices with unique properties and unique capabilities
  • Users do not use tablets and smartphones to do the same things because they way they interact with them is different
  • Mobile development needs to determine if distinct tablet and smartphone apps are required by understanding use cases and device capabilities

11:30 am - 12:00 pm

Executive Exchange

Roundtable

Planning for a MultiCloud Future

The promise of the cloud is almost beyond compare; infinite computing resources, unmatched reliability and uptime, instantaneous service availability, simplistic self-service and provisioning, and the low-low prices of a “buy by the drink” model. These are the reasons behind the rush to the cloud that we are currently experiencing, but the wholesale adoption does bring a downside – as more and more capability is moved to the cloud, more and more cloud providers are utilized since, for the most part, each provider offers only a limited suite of services. The MultiCloud environment that creates a new set of challenges that IT leaders need to overcome, notably resiliency, interoperability/integration, and security and compliance through careful planning and the lessons learned from building complex on premise distributed systems.

Takeaways:

  • As enterprises move to the cloud, MultiCloud environments will increasingly become the norm, not the exception
  • Consistent planning and thoughtful architecture will be essential to efficient and effective cloud deployments
  • IT leaders do not need to be alarmed, they’ve been down the complex environment path before, but they do need to be careful

Roundtable

Identity and the New Age of Enterprise Security

From a technology standpoint, as a “society” the world of business has gone through two distinct stages in the evolution of its information security focus. The first addressed network based protection and preventative controls such as firewalls and anti-malware. The second looked at data-centric and detective controls such as encryption and intrusion/extrusion monitoring. Since breaches continue to occur at a record pace, what is need new is clearly a new evolution, one that pushes towards individual focused security through granular user monitoring and management as provided by solutions such as Identity and Access Management. While IAM isn’t a new technology field, it is one whose time has come and CISO need to begin investing in modern-day, light-weight, easy to implement IAM solutions now to stay ahead of the curve, and reduce enterprise threats. 

Takeaways: 

• The breach onslaught demonstrates that existing security solutions are incapable of defending current threats 

• Enterprises need to begin looking at security from an activity perspective rather than an artifact perspective 

• IAM provides activity insight, and therefore threat awareness, no other platform can equal

12:05 pm - 12:35 pm

Executive Exchange

Think Tank

The Rise of the Alternate Lender

The banking industry is one that rarely would be described as “innovative”, with all players seemingly taking a “what’s good for one is good for all” approach where no-one particularly upsets the status quo in anything but small and incremental ways. If the latest evidence from the European market is anything to go by, however, the potential exists that a major shakeup could be in the offing as a host of so-called “Challenger” banks are bursting onto the scene. Whether from upstart financial services organizations, of companies entrenched in non-related fields such as retail, new entrants are coming to market that having nothing invested in old school processes, not in the semi-competitive landscape that currently exists. Change is coming and Financial Services CIOs need to look to their own house to ensure the people, processes, and technologies are in place to respond to this new threat.

Takeaways:

  • Since the financial collapse of 2008, most consumers have felt an eroded sense of trust with incumbent banks that they do not feel with alternate lenders
  • Challengers are not tied to outdated and expensive products, back-end processes, or technology allowing them to cherry-pick and do so economically
  • Changes in the UK, Europe, and Canadian marketplaces mean change is imminent in the US

Presented by:

David Hopkins, Managing Director IT (Divisional CIO), American Airlines View details

 
 

Think Tank

Disaster Recovery and Preparing for the Inevitable

Like death and taxes, IT outages are an inevitability whether as the result of power loss, telecommunications outage, or any one of a myriad other potential technical and non-technical issues. In this environment, the savvy CIO knows that what matters most is preparation – being ready for that next outage with an IT infrastructure that is both resilient and flexible and Disaster Recovery procedures that allow for efficient and effective recovery, balancing Recovery Time and Recovery Point objectives with appropriate cost. Disasters happen but with proper planning they don’t have to be disastrous to your business.

Takeaways:

  • In the event of a severe outage, businesses without a Disaster Recovery plan are at a significant disadvantage when it comes to recoverability and viability
  • DR planning cannot be an “at all costs” proposition and appropriate planning must take into account reasonable Recovery Time and Recovery Point objectives
  • Catastrophic outages get the press but are the thin end of the wedge – minor service interruptions are far more common and must be planned for as well

Call for Speakers

12:40 pm - 1:40 pm

Networking Luncheon


1:45 pm - 2:15 pm

Executive Exchange

Think Tank

Insurance is a Business that is Becoming Cloudy at its Core

As insurers of all shapes and sizes stare down the time-consuming and inherently risky proposition of a core systems replacement, increasingly they are beginning to consider the adoption of public cloud to facilitate this. As SaaS solutions become available they offer the possibility of a plug-and-play end-to-end solution while IaaS allows insurers to maintain a greater measure of control while deploying a new system in parallel minimizing risk and simultaneously controlling cost. Cloud migrations are never completely straightforward however, and many of the tools targeted at insurers are still in their early days. Insurance, by definition, is an industry focused on the mitigation of risk and insurance IT leaders need to be vigilant as they consider their cloud options for core systems replacement.

Takeaways:

  • Cloud core systems allow insurers the flexibility to deploy new systems in parallel to existing tools to minimize risk by ensuring stability before cutover
  • Fully-baked SaaS solutions offer end-to-end functionality but may require the insurer to adapt internal process to align with service functions
  • IaaS allows for a roll-your-own approach that offloads infrastructure capital cost and management concerns but introduces potential “house divided” issues with two groups responsible for the IT stack that runs the business

Think Tank

NFV and SDN – Building the Network of the Future

Cloud has changed the way we build back-end systems, mobility has changed the way we build the front end too, and now the combination of Network Functions Virtualization (NFV) and Software Defined Networking (SDN) is going to change the way we build networks. By allowing for the separation of control plane and data plane while simultaneously migrating both of those pieces to inexpensive commodity hardware we allow for the creation of more redundant, more dynamic, more efficient, and far less costly networks, eliminating a major bottle-neck to IT and service innovation. CIOs must begin investigating and implementing these technologies now to ensure they are on the leading edge of service delivery.

Takeaways:

  • The traditional way of building networks is archaic and its lifespan limited – NFV and SDN promise far greater flexibility of cost effectiveness
  • These technologies are admittedly early phase, but so were cloud and mobility when they began radically changing the technology landscape
  • Now is the time to begin to invest in pilot projects, to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to leverage the technologies as they mature

Call for Speakers

2:20 pm - 2:50 pm

Executive Exchange

Thought Leadership

TBD


Sponsored by:

8x8 View details

 
 

2:55 pm - 3:25 pm

Executive Exchange

Roundtable

Embrace the Cloud: Adopting a Brokerage Model

The allure of the Cloud is three-fold: the widely seen benefits are reduced cost, increased flexibility, and enhanced time to market. As a result, business are rushing to the Cloud in ever increasing droves. In many cases, however, the rush is omitting the IT department until it is too late, and the specter of incompatible data and communications standards, of an inability to integrate with existing on-premise systems hangs over these deployments. To combat these issues, IT leaders need to recognize the value provided by the Cloud and develop a brokerage model whereby IT can direct business peers to the right Cloud delivered service.

Takeaways:

  • Learn what the benefits of the cloud are, and why estimates are being missed
  • Understand the drivers of these misses and why they are a problem
  • Determine the best approach for IT to take to head those problems off while offering an even higher level of service and value

Roundtable

Making Mobile Apps Enterprise Apps with Clean Integration

Application integration is a challenging task no matter what the platform being used. Finding a way to have various enterprise applications communicate and work together cleanly and efficiently requires dedication and focus. Mobile apps stand on the precipices of disrupting everything that enterprises have done so far to manage application integration by throwing new platforms, new communication methodologies, new coding languages and new APIs into the mix. As mobile apps increasingly become the primary enterprise apps as opposed to simplified extensions of existing ones, CIOs and IT departments will need to look at application integration with fresh eyes to ensure that both utmost performance and rock solid operability continues to be offered across the entire integrated application suite.

Takeaways:

  • Application integration is a complex challenge at the best of times; the introduction of an increasing number of enterprise mobile apps will only complicate things further
  • Application integration is the key to efficient application, and therefore business, operations and so cannot simply be ignored or pushed to the back burner
  • Businesses that do not tightly integrate enterprise mobile apps with core enterprise applications run significant risks

3:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Executive Exchange

Roundtable

Cloud, Crowd, Content: Changing the Big Data Game

It’s no secret that Big Data is a big deal, but just how big is it? Some estimates show that while we have a massive 2 Zettabytes under collective corporate management, that this represents one ten thousandth of a percent of the data that has been created. Fortunately, those other “nexus” technologies are providing the opportunity to make use of these untapped data resources – mobile is providing a ubiquitous input channel, cloud a dynamically scalable processing capability, and social the community involvement to process and find value. Leveraged well Big Data can solve a wealth of corporate challenges, ranging from improving efficiency, through mitigating risk, to actually growing bottom line revenue.

Takeaways:

  • Understand how big Big Data really is and where the value to your organization lies
  • Learn what problems Big Data solves and how it achieves value
  • Be challenged to think about the future of Big Data in your organization

Roundtable

IoT and IT/OT

One of the key areas for early IoT projects is in the area of industrial automation, as an extension of existing, older M2M type technologies. In many cases these older industrial automation initiatives used proprietary communications protocols and dedicated sensors that interfaced with controllers that could manage communications between IT and OT platforms. Fast forward to an IoT world however and these sensors and controllers will need to natively speak IP, natively integrate to back-end enterprise systems beyond just simple controllers, systems such as ERP, BI and other core platforms. Navigating the complexity of process, data, security, and functionality implications has the potential to be a minefield for the unwitting IT executive that goes in without eyes wide open.

Takeaways:

  • IT/OT integration is a low-hanging fruit area for IoT adoption
  • Existing investments into older M2M IT/OT integrations however can erode any potential value
  • Before investing in IoT enabled IT/OT integration careful consideration must be made of the implications and whether value can be realized – does the investment justify the returns over what is already in place?

4:05 pm - 4:35 pm

Executive Exchange

Think Tank

Designing the Factory of the Future

For years we have heard about and talked about the “Factory of the Future” with no real consistency in terms of defining what exactly that is, what makes it so futuristic; enhanced technology, improved process, and greater people capabilities. In truth, the factory of the future is built upon and requires all of these things – the greater deployment of technology solutions to gather data and facilitate existing workflows; radically enhanced operational processes based on new patterns identified with deep data analysis; highly skilled and technically competent personnel that have the wherewithal and background to bring technology to bear in enhancing manufacturing process. Building a strategy that incorporates all three areas and synthesizes them seamlessly is therefore essential to long-term success.

Takeaways:

  • The factory of the future needs radically improved process and materials efficiency to justify investment
  • Implementation of MES / MOM type solutions always for greater understanding and automation of processes but is not enough by itself to qualify as “the future”
  • Ultimately the greatest pressures in the factory of the future will fall upon the personnel that are not just building it, but also those operating it

Think Tank

Leadership Considerations in a Multi-Generational World

Executives are currently facing a difficult challenge in terms of personnel management because they are dealing with three very different generational groups of workers – Baby Boomers, Gen Xers, and Millennials. These three groups all have very different outlooks on the world and on work, and all have very different work styles and capabilities. These differences lead to lack of understanding and conflict in a lot of cases, conflict that leaders must learn how to overcome. Smart leaders know that they need to leverage the differences between generations rather than expecting, and trying to force, everyone to be the same, and that building an integrated workforce, with complimentary skills and abilities, is the key to long-term workforce stability.

Takeaways:

  • Boomers (1946 to 1964), Gen Xers (1965 to 1980), and Millennials (1981-2000) have had different life experiences which has given them different outlooks
  • Each group has specific and unique strengths that can and should be brought to bear to improve the enterprise
  • Building an integrated team that recognizes and rewards differences yields greater success than trying to homogenize everyone to the same standard

Call for Speakers

4:40 pm - 5:20 pm

Executive Visions

Shadow IT – To Embrace or Eliminate?

Best practice in most enterprises, at least as far as the CIO and CISO goes, is to squash Shadow IT wherever it is encountered. Shadow IT, the argument goes, leads to a world of data and integration problems for the IT department, and significant amounts of unknown and unquantifiable risk for the information security group. A small but vocal minority however is beginning to advocate for Shadow IT as a catalyst of innovation, citing the increases in productivity and creativity by allowing enterprise staff to find their own out of the box solutions to organizational problems. CISOs can allow their organizations to have their cake (Shadow IT) and eat it too (still be secure) by following a few simple steps that allow them to build in security regardless of user activity.

Takeaways:

  • Shadow IT is not malicious activity; it is simply the Line of Business user community looking to be efficient and effective
  • A well-developed security program can take Shadow IT into account and incorporate protection mechanisms that allow end user flexibility
  • Embracing Shadow IT does not mean “no holds barred” and end users need to understand the limit of the boundaries and the reason for their existence

Panelists:

David Hopkins, Managing Director IT (Divisional CIO), American Airlines View details

 
 

5:20 pm - 6:30 pm

Cocktail Reception

6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

Networking Dinner

8:00 pm - 10:00 pm

After Dinner Networking

Tuesday, November 8, 2016 - CIO Summit

7:00 am - 8:00 am

Networking Breakfast

8:10 am - 8:50 am

Keynote Presentation

The Role of the CIO: Business Challenger, Innovation Driver

Since the inception of the role, the focus of the CIO has primarily been one of Technologist and IT Operations Manager; selecting the tools and services necessary to support the business, and then efficiently and effectively operating them. This is a future of declining organizational value however as technology becomes increasingly democratized and other organizational groups take control over individual systems and data sets. CIOs need to recast themselves instead as Strategists and Business Innovators; leveraging their unique position at the crux of the organization to propose alternatives to the accepted way of doing things, and to drive organizational growth through business alignment and organizational change.

Takeaways:

  • CIO’s are at a fork in the road; they can continue to be Operational or evolve and become Transformational
  • Transformation efforts cannot stop at the boundaries of the IT department, they must reach into the business as a whole, addressing process and defining new capability
  • Visionary CIOs will move their departments from cost centers to value creators, and move themselves from executive afterthoughts to true organization leaders

8:55 am - 9:35 am

Keynote Presentation

Implementing Business Simplification for Success and Growth

Organizational complexity is the single most significant impediment that enterprises are dealing with today; it underlies every business problem enterprises faces and undermines every effort to address them. Organizational complexity is grounded in cumbersome processes, but those poor processes exist only because enterprise applications themselves, including those that are customer facing, as well as those that are not, are complex and unwieldy. To address cultural complexity then, enterprises must eliminate the complexity in their application suite by either building new, buying new, or more efficiently simplifying what they already have. Only by simplification can enterprises eliminate complexity in an efficient and effective way and position themselves for success.

Takeaways:

  • Enterprises live and breath by the speed with which regular transactions occur – turning these into one minute transactions is the key to success
  • Complexity must be eliminated in all applications customer-facing, core internal, and internal supporting alike
  • Building or buying new, less complex applications offers limited gains because eventually all introduce complexities of their own; only simplified applications offer long term, sustained elimination of complexity

9:45 am - 10:15 am

Executive Exchange

Think Tank

IT/OT Integration

While the hardware, software, and general capability of enterprise information technology (IT) systems has grown at an ever accelerating pace, the same cannot be said for enterprise operational technology (OT) because the systems controlled by this computing capability tend to be relatively static. However as utility companies begin to enter into a period marked by radical innovation, expansion, and change, the needs demanded of the enterprise OT are exploding. Increasingly enterprises are seeing greater benefit in migrating operational management responsibilities to more mature and capable IT systems than they are in investing in OT enhancement. To realize the expected benefits IT departments must ensure tight alignment and integration of these two disparate platforms.

Takeaways:

  • Integration of IT and OT systems allows for more cost flexibility because the necessary compute capacity already exists in the IT world
  • Bringing IT and OT systems together allows for greater information sharing between platforms making the whole greater than the sum of the parts
  • IT departments need to spear-head integration plans, bringing management of OT systems in house while stepping carefully so as not to crush operational toes

Call for Speakers

Think Tank

Evolution of the Data Center and the Interconnected Enterprise

Each era of the digital economy has introduced innovations that fostered new forms of interaction; we've gone from connecting machines and people so they can share information to online collaboration and real-time participation. Just as PCs, networks, and Web apps revolutionized previous digital eras, interconnection is this era's game-changer. In the workplace of the future, customers, employees and partners will be dispersed over more geographic locations, using more devices and expecting more than ever, but current IT architectures that were built for a different time are in conflict with many of the core requirements of future computing. An interconnected enterprise directly connects its employees, partners and customers to what they need, in the right context, using the devices, channels and services. The result: extraordinary experiences for your customers, high engagement for your employees, top value for your shareholders and exponential growth for your business.

Takeaways:

  • Organizations today are increasingly focused on achieving growth through new products, services, and markets in an ever-evolving digital economy
  • The rate of business change today is accelerating and technology leaders need to differentiate themselves by reimagining their approach
  • Enterprise that embrace advanced interconnection strategies are discovering that the challenges of growth, speed, scale, security, and engagement can be effectively addressed

10:20 am - 10:50 am

Executive Exchange

Thought Leadership

Balancing Reactivity and Proactivity in Enterprise Security

As with all things in life, the focus on how to conduct enterprise security ebbs and flows between varying degrees of reactivity and proactivity. In the old school “Security 1.0” world, where the focus was almost completely on network security, efforts were in general proactive in nature with firewalls and anti-malware seeking to prevent threats before they even occurred. This didn’t work so well and so “Security 2.0” focused on reactivity, wrapping things like encryption around the data so that even if a breach occurred, the loss would be mitigated. Yet breaches, and losses, continue to occur. So if primarily proactive security doesn’t work, and if primarily reactive security also doesn’t work, how then do we find the right balance between the two to find a security posture that does work?

Takeaways:

  • Proactive security measures, those that prevent a threat from occurring are valuable and necessary but haven’t proven effective
  • Reactive security measures, those that mitigate a threat that has occurred are also valuable but complicated a limit enterprise efficiency and efficacy
  • A new approach is needed, but is that one that blends techniques or one that finds new approaches (whether they be reactive, proactive, or both)?

10:55 am - 11:25 am

Executive Exchange

Roundtable

Cloud Adoption Challenges on a Macro Level

The hype around the cloud is pervasive and can be potentially overwhelming but numerous studies have shown that tangible benefits can be had, whether in cost savings, efficiency improvements, or flexibility enhancements. That said numerous impediments exist to not just realizing that value, but even considering adoption; regulatory issues, integration challenges, business process revamp, and a dozen other challenges can halt cloud projects in their tracks before they get off the ground. In this group discussion we’ll explore those inhibitors, understanding which challenges prevent adoption and what can be done to overcome them.

Takeaways:

  • The cloud presents a significant opportunity to organizations and while most have adopted in some form or other, wholesale adoption still lags
  • To realize benefits enterprises must deal with a variety of challenges each one requiring different solutions
  • Industry by industry adoption is constrained for different reasons but do common solutions exist that can resolve issues across the board?

Roundtable

Mobile Data Quality

Data quality has long been one of the most challenging issues that IT organizations and the enterprises that are hoe to them have had to deal with. Everyone knows that these data quality issues exist, but the cost and complication of addressing them has pushed them to the back burner. We stand however at a precipice, one that has been brought on us by mobile computing – as more devices enter the hands of more users, more data is being created and consumed, making the data quality issue more pressing, more relevant, and more urgent to solve. IT leaders can no longer ignore data quality issues for the good of their companies and the good of their careers and need to bring this issue to the fore and get it resolved before the avalanche sweeps them under.

Takeaways:

  • Data quality is hard and unappealing and so in many case it is simply not done, or not done effectively
  • Enterprises have been scuffling by with poor data quality capabilities and may be convinced that the situation is manageable
  • Even though data volumes have grown quickly over the last few years, mobility is set to give data volume a near vertical growth curve which will compound and highlight this fundamental issue

11:30 am - 12:00 pm

Executive Exchange

Roundtable

Big Data and Analytics at the Scale of Mobility

The explosive growth of data volume and data variety that have characterized this new Big Data era are set to head in a steeper upward trajectory as enterprises collectively begin to exploit the massive data flows that are coming out of mobile devices. As the volume of mobile devices eclipses that of human beings on the planet, just imagine the data volume that can be captured when every device and every individual is streaming a constant set of contextual “status” information. Data growth by itself however is only a small portion of the story, as to have value this data must be analysed in essentially real-time in order to create actionable outcomes.

Takeaways:

  • Big Data today may be big, but every single one of the “v’s” that compose it (Volume, Variety, Velocity, Veracity and Value) is set to increase exponentially as a result of wholesale mobility adoption
  • The ability to analyse, interpret, and find meaning in this vast sea of data will be single biggest differentiator in enterprise success
  • Enterprises will have to walk a fine line when it comes to privacy of the information they collect to ensure the continued ability to do so.

Roundtable

IPv6 Adoption

As IT Leaders, we have all been aware of the impending need to move from IPv4 to IPv6 protocols as the number of available IP addresses withers to next to nothing. Many have deferred this task however, simply making use of private internal address spaces to defer the inevitable work. As IoT becomes a fait accompli however, ignoring the issue is no longer a viable alternative; to be able to connect and access the vast number of public sensors and other IoT devices IPv6 must be adopted wholesale. CIOs that have not yet done so must begin IPv6 migration projects now to ensure that they are not roadblocks to growth and innovation as a result of IoT adoption.

Takeaways:

  • Understand whether to build net new in parallel, or upgrade existing networks
  • Changes will extend beyond just the infrastructure – internal and external applications will be affected as will WAN service providers
  • IPv6 migration is not a trivial effort; significant upfront planning is required and this initiative cannot be handled in a reactionary manner

12:05 pm - 12:45 pm

Executive Visions

Diversity in IT

The importance technology plays within an enterprise will only continue to gain momentum as more developers, engineers, and programmers enter the workforce. As these segments continue to grow, so does the diversity of the workforce within the technology field. For a field that is severely constrained by a talent and skills gap, this influx of bodies can only be a good thing. Beyond the basic ability to deliver of identified capabilities a diverse workforce, whether cultural or gender influenced offers a whole that is more than the sum of the parts. Finding ways to drive and increase diversity in IT then should be a key focus for every IT executive.

Takeaways:

  • Identify the importance behind diversity in technology, opportunities, and capabilities
  • Discuss the importance of cultivating diversity at the grass-roots level and building post-secondary programs that drive awareness of and interest in IT
  • Understand the hurdles that exist that limit the prevalence of diversity in IT, and what steps must be taken to lower, if not eliminate, them

12:45 pm - 12:55 pm

Thank You Address and Closing Remarks

1:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Grab and Go Luncheon

1:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Shuttle-Bus to Golf Tournament

2:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Nine-Hole Golf Tournament

5:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Shuttle-Bus back from Golf Tournament

5:30 pm - 6:30 pm

Networking Cocktail Reception

6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

Networking Dinner

8:00 pm - 10:00 pm

After Dinner Networking